National Prisoners of War - Missing in Action (POW/ MIA) Recognition Day - VA Western New York Healthcare System
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VA Western New York Healthcare System

 

National Prisoners of War - Missing in Action (POW/ MIA) Recognition Day

September 16, 2019

Print Version (MS Word)

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                                

Contact:  Evangeline Conley, Public Affairs Officer

Phone:   (716) 862-8753; Cell: (716) 512-9338

E-mail:    Evangeline.Conley@va.gov

National Prisoners of War - Missing in Action (POW/ MIA) Recognition Day at VA Western New York Healthcare System
 

A ceremony honoring former Prisoners of War and those Missing in Action will be held on Thursday, September 19, at 11am in Freedom Hall, Room 301 at VA Western New York Healthcare System, 3495 Bailey Avenue in Buffalo, New York. National POW/MIA Recognition Day was signed into law in 1984 to remind Americans to stand behind those who have served and to account for those who have never returned. We will remember the courageous 142,000 Americans taken as prisoners of war since the First World War and 1,587 who remain missing. During this recognition ceremony, we will honor several former POWs who are expected to attend and remember those MIA by expressing that America has not forgotten them.

             Karen Zale of Franklinville, New York, a retired Homeland Security employee recently authored a book about her father’s (born John Zubrzycki) years as a former POW of the Japanese during WWII. Her book, released in May of this year, is titled ‘The Will to Survive.’ Her father survived the Bataan Death March in April of 1942, when 70,000 men were taken prisoner in the Philippines and forced marched through 75 miles of jungle to a POW camp without much food or water. He was eventually transferred by a Japanese “hell ship” ship to Manchuria, China, where he spent 3½ years in a work camp. He was freed by the Russian Army in August of 1945.

Light refreshments will be served. The public is welcome and encouraged to attend this special event honoring our heroes.  

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